Vol. 24, No. 1/2, Spring/Summer 1986 - "Guidelines for Pennsylvania Geography Education"



REVITALIZING GEOGRAPHY IN THE CURRICULUM

(pp. 1 – 5)


John E. Benhart

Shippensburg University


Abstract


The Association of American Geographers and The National Council for Geographic Education cooperated to publish Guidelines for Geographic Education at the elementary and secondary schools in 1984. The publication, supported by the Gildea Foundation has had a major impact on revitalizing geography in the United States and Canada.




GEOGRAPHY IN PENNSYLVANIA: A TIME OF TRANSITION

(pp. 6 – 10)


Ian Ackroyd-Kelly

East Stroudsburg University


Abstract


It seems that whenever academic geographers get together, the conversation at some point gets around to the exchange of stories relating various facets of the geographical ignorance of the students in their classes. While usually presented in a humorous vein, underlying each of these tales is the seldom spoken, but always implied suggestion that "... this is appalling and someone should be doing something about it!" Equally implied is the suggestion that the speaker, especially if he or she is from the ranks of higher education, is doing all that is within his or her power to rectify the problem whose genesis usually lies somewhere else -- often at the elementary and secondary level. There must be, it is suggested, something more which can be accomplished to improved geographic understanding. In other words, two questions are raised: first, what must be done, and second, how may that best be accomplished?




IMPROVING GEOGRAPHIC EDUCATION AND PENNSYLVANIA

(pp. 11 – 17)


Ruth I. Shirey

Indiana University of Pennsylvania


Abstract


The year 1982 saw the renewal of nationwide calls for improvements in geographic education. The Chronicle for Higher Education carried letters by prominent geographers at major universities, including the University of California at Berkeley, the University of Minnesota, and the Pennsylvania State University, under the title, "The Importance of the Geographic Viewpoint."1 During the same time period, the Chicago Tribune, New York Times, Kansas City Star, San Francisco Examiner and other national and regional newspapers called for improvements in geographic education in editorials.2 The support for geographic education and interest in the work of geographers continues to occur with regularlity in 1986.




THE USE AND IMPACT OF SPORTS IN TEACHING GEOGRAPHY

(pp. 18 – 26)


John J. Katana

Indiana Junior High School

Indiana, PA


Abstract


Sports today in America is a business, a big business. It creates an impact on all levels of our society. It ranges from the inner city basketball player who is hoping to make the NBA to the kid on the block that makes a diving catch on the concrete; from the dream of playing in the Super Bowl to the reality of the classroom. The following deals with this impact that sports can have in the classroom in what the writer calls "Impact Education".




THE WESTERN DIVISION OF THE PENNSYLVANIA CANAL: AN HISTORICAL GEOGRAPHY

(pp. 27 – 35)


Donald J. Ballas

Indiana University of Pennsylvania


Abstract


Despite its importance and interest, little or nothing has been published concerning the historical geography of the Pennsylvania Canal System. As a matter of fact, there is a paucity of geographic literature on canals in general in the United States. Although perhaps more inspirational than informational, this paper will introduce the historical geography of the Pennsylvania Canal, emphasizing its "Western Division" with even more particular focus on aspects of the canal and related features in Indiana County.



The Pennsylvania Geographical Society exists to promote effective geographic teaching, research, and literacy.


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