Vol. 15, No. 2, September 1977 - "Transportation Geography"

 

 

 

URBAN TRANSPORTATION EFFICIENCY: HOW HIGH A PRIORITY?

(pp. 1 - 12)

 

Gary R. Hovinen

Millersville State College

 

Abstract

 

How long your students' parents -- and you -- spend getting to and from work can be a topic for investigation by your geography class, for geography is well suited to a study of such community problems as urban transportation. Two themes lend themselves especially to geographic consideration. First, what is transportation's effect on development patterns in metropolitan areas?1 Second, what is the effect of development patterns on travel behavior and on the nature of transportation problems? This article will consider the second question especially the impact of alternative land use arrangements on transportation problems such as traffic congestion, length of travel times, and air pollution from motor vehicles.

 

 

 

THE SOCIO-ECONOMIC BACKGROUND OF THE TRANSPORTATION PROBLEMS IN TAIWAN: A CASE STUDY OF THE LESS DEVELOPED COUNTRIES IN TRANSPORTATION

(pp. 13 - 21)

 

Chuen T. Chou and Burton O. Witthuhn

Edinboro State College

 

Abstract

 

Modernization is aprocess by which countries develop from rudimentary to advanced stages of economic activity. Normally, modernization follows five stages of development: rudimentary, primary, secondary, tertiary and quaternary. This paper, using the case study of Taiwan, focuses on a nation that has entered into the intermediate or tertiary stage. Taiwan serves as a model for less developed countries as they attempt to cope with the initial stages of the modernization process.

 

 

 

USING THE 1970 CENSUS OF POPULATION TO UNDERSTAND URBAN TRANSPORTATION PATTERNS

(pp. 22 - 28)

 

Harry Orsag

California State College

 

Abstract

 

Most major problems relating to urban transportation in the United States are realized by Americans because they are the victims of the problems: congestion, pollution, rising costs and general inefficiency. However, few understand the specific nature of these problems and the associated factors. Geography can help promote this understanding because the problems and the associated factors are most effectively understood in their spatial context. These spatial patterns including the dispersed nature of residences, businesses and work have resulted from almost total reliance on the automobile. This dependence continues to alter the character and location of our commercial, residential and industrial areas. Depicting this pattern of travel to students, particularly as it relates to residence, work and auto, is the purpose of this article.


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