Vol. 49, No. 2, Fall/Winter 2011- "The Pennsylvania Geographer"




CLEANING UP THE COMPETITION WITH GISCIENCE: A MARKET AREA ANALYSIS OF YELLOW VAN CLEANING SERVICES


Paul R. Burger and H. Jason Combs

Department of Geography & Earth Science

University of Nebraska-Kearney


Abstract


William Applebaum is widely credited with devising many pioneering marketing geography methods during the post-World War II period which are still used today. Applebaum’s practical experience and empirical methods focusing on customer origins allowed companies to answer basic spatial questions in regard to where the business should locate and advertise. Many of Applebaum’s pioneering methods have been enhanced by GIScience. Businesses are now using GIS to integrate data from a variety of sources to plan for market area change, analyze sales performance, and select locations for new businesses or identify existing locations where performance is unsatisfactory. One such enterprise is Yellow Van Cleaning and Restoration Services based in Kearney, Nebraska. Using the results from this project, Yellow Van is searching for store frontage in areas where the unrealized potential within their existing market area is greatest. The company also organizes customer prospects based on neighborhoods using the block-groups with the greatest sales potential and targeting those areas with direct marketing strategies.





DESIGN EFFICIENCY: AN ANALYSIS OF SEWER DIFFERENCES BETWEEN FORM-BASED AND CONVENTIONAL NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENT DESIGNS IN LANCASTER COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA


Carolyn M. Keene

Dorothy Ives-Dewey

and James L. Lewandowski

Department of Geography and Planning

West Chester University


Abstract


Form-based development is often championed as a tool to use land and fiscal resources more efficiently. Whereas conventional development patterns commonly consist of large lots, low density and cookie-cutter designs, form based development offers an alternative that uses land more efficiently and attractively. Infrastructure cost savings is one of the purported advantages of this type of development. Using data from Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, this study presents an empirical assessment of infrastructure efficiencies of form-based

neighborhoods over conventional neighborhoods. This paper contributes to the empirical literature by presenting a quantified assessment of the impact of development design on sewer infrastructure at the neighborhood level. Findings indicate that both neighborhood form and lot size have a statistically significant impact on the amount of sewer utilized, suggesting that communities built with greater attention to design result in a more efficient use of infrastructure.





A GIS ANALYSIS OF THE PRE-COLUMBIAN CHACO LANDSCAPE: APPLYING NEW TOOLS TO OLD PROBLEMS


Aaron Clark and Joy A. Fritschle

Department of Geography and Planning

West Chester University


Abstract


The civilization that developed at Chaco Canyon in New Mexico between 850-1200 AD constructed what appear to be a series of roads. While the term “Chaco Roads” is generally accepted, the function of these structures is in doubt. Many of the roads seem to be constructed in discontinuous segments, and it is not certain whether these segments are the full extent of the original construction, or merely what remains after hundreds of years of decay. GIS and statistical analysis of the environmental characteristics of road segments assessed the potential for differential erosion. The results of discriminant analysis showed ground-visible prehistoric roads were more reliably predicted by the model suggesting a relationship between environmental setting and ground-visible roads. However, the model did not correctly predict the gaps between ground-visible road segments, suggesting that the roads were fragmentary. More research is needed to improve the predictive capabilities of the model.






HYDROCLIMATIC TRENDS IN THE SUSQUEHANNA RIVER BASIN


Katherine Smith

and Timothy W. Hawkins

Department of Geography and Earth Science

Shippensburg University


Abstract


Maximum and minimum temperature, diurnal temperature range, precipitation, and streamflow were examined for the Susquehanna River Basin for the time periods 1895-2008 and 1980-2008. Annual maximum and minimum temperatures have warmed 0.7°C/century and 0.3°C/century respectively for the 1895-2008 time period and 2.9°C/century and 3.2°C/century respectively for the1980-2008 time period. The greatest warming has generally occurred in winter, at lower elevations, and in the north and east. Average annual precipitation has increased 0.6 mm/century and 5.8 mm/century for the 1895-2008 and 1980-2008 time frames respectively. Precipitation increases are greatest in fall and at higher elevations. While generally not significant, streamflow for winter, summer, fall, and therefore annually have increased. Spring streamflow has decreased. Results provide a context for future decisions regarding water management in the basin. 



THE IMPACT OF WAL-MART SUPERCENTERS UPON PENNSYLVANIA GROCERY RETAILING


Thomas O. Graff

Department of Geosciences

University of Arkansas

and Hubert B. Stroud

Department of Criminology, Sociology and Geography

Arkansas State University


Abstract


The American retail grocery industry is undergoing major changes. One of the most significant changes is related to Wal-Mart’s rapid rise as a grocery retailer. It is now the largest grocery retailer in the nation. In many aspects Pennsylvania is a microcosm of the American retailing landscape. Though Pennsylvania is located far from the Wal-Mart base area, the firm has become the largest grocery retailer in the state. As Wal-Mart continues to increase its market share, there is a corresponding shift from traditional grocery retailing to niche marketers trying to become upscale alternative to Wal-Mart. Though WalMart has yet to expand its dense network of Supercenters into eastern and southeastern Pennsylvania, it appears to be a matter of time before the firm becomes a dominant force in these markets too. The recent A&P bankruptcy declaration provides other supermarket chains the opportunity to expand quickly into the fragmented southeastern Pennsylvania grocery market.





MASSIVE DEFORESTATION IN ROMANIA: THE FUTURE LOOKS GLOOMY


Octavian Cocos

Faculty of Geography

University of Bucharest

Alina Cocos

Hyperion College

Bucharest, Romania


Abstract


This paper is based on secondary document analysis and field observations and is meant to raise awareness about a serious ecological problem before it is too late. Abusive deforestation and the irresponsible policies of the authorities have brought Romania into the situation of being the only European country where the forested area decreases continuously. Despite this, clearings still go on; the extensive robbery is hard to stop and the authorities seem to be overwhelmed by the gravity of the situation. Under the circumstances, the future consequences are hard to estimate. The triggering of landslides, stream flow reductions, water table decline, and climate change and the development of southeastern Moldavia and the Mehedinti tableland as one of the only arid enclaves in Europe, are menacing signs that predict a gloomy future. Most specialists agree that Romania is on the verge of an impending ecological breakdown. Such pessimistic scenarios contend that in a few decades Europe’s former granary will no longer be able to feed its own citizens.




THE LONGER-TERM IMPACTS OF DEINDUSTRIALIZATION IN

PITTSBURGH’S MONONGAHELA VALLEY


Paul Sissons

The Work Foundation

London, England


Abstract


The paper discusses the longer-term impacts of deindustrialization on the Monongahela Valley in southwest Pennsylvania, an area which suffered from the closure of five large US Steel owned mills during the mid-1980s. Sets of Labor Market Accounts (LMAs) describe the changes in labor supply and demand over the immediate post-closure period and over the longer-term. They show the crucial role that outward migration played in absorbing job losses. The LMAs are supplemented by analysis of other demographic and labor market data to show the impact which this migration has on the area. Taken together this evidence shows that rather than a short-term adjustment in factor markets deindustrialization can become a process on ongoing and cumulative decline. 





The Pennsylvania Geographical Society exists to promote effective geographic teaching, research, and literacy.


Click here to contact the webmaster

Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software