Vol. 11, No. 3, November 1973 - "Education"

 

 

 

UTILIZATION OF THE SYSTEMS CONCEPT IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF A PROGRAM IN GEOGRAPHY EDUCATION

(pp. 3 - 5)

 

Eugenia Baxter

Ringgold School District

 

In our time of improved technology and knowledge explosion, the systems concept has come to the foreground in education as well as in other fields. Educators and scholars are forced to think in systems and subsystems, together with their interconnections involving input, output, and end results. The diversified forms of knowledge within the discipline of geography education have made the systems concept meaningful and workable. Geography is concerned with interrelationships of basic concepts of both the natural sciences (physical and biological) and the behavioral sciences (anthropology, sociology, psychology, history, political science, and economics).

 

 

 

 

"GEOGRAPHY OF THE CITIES IN THE INTERMEDIATE GRADES"

(pp. 6 - 8)

 

Dr. John E. Benhart; Chairman, Geography-Earth Science Department

Shippensburg State College

 

Dr. Paul Mazza; Director, Rowland Laboratory School

Shippensburg State College

 

Mr. Gerald Strock; Principal

Mary B. Sharpe Elementary School

 

Abstract

 

Many teachers would agree that urban geography is important. Certainly the urban environment is a topic of importance to our society and, consequently, to our pupils. The majority of our children's impressions of urban society and its problems (when was the last time there was an hour special on TV that dealt with the advantages of urban living) are that which is portrayed by mass media. Regardless of what section of an urban area children live in, their impressions are overly influenced by their immediate surroundings. Children's perceptions of urban living are based on a narrow band of involvement, whether it is a ghetto or suburban area makes little difference in reference to the narrowness of the experience. A child living in a suburban area has an equally distorted view of urban living as does a child living in a ghetto area. If children do not live in an urban area their perceptions are shaped by books such as The Little House by Virginia Burton, whatever they saw or heard on mass media, and the views of the non-urban people in their area.


The Pennsylvania Geographical Society exists to promote effective geographic teaching, research, and literacy.


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