Vol. 21, No. 3/4, Fall 1983 - "Current Research Themes in Geography"



THE TRANSACTIONAL CITY: A CALL FOR RESEARCH AND POLICY ATTENTION

(pp. 1 – 6)


Kenneth E. Corey

University of Maryland

College Park, Maryland


Abstract


Some societies and economies are manifesting a shift to a dominance of employment in services and post-industrial, information-age occupations. Introduced here are some of the implications for cities as this new, "transactional" era evolves. The need for geographers to utilize their knowledge towards better understanding the transactional city is stressed.




THE DEVELOPMENT OF INDICES FOR CLIMATE/SOCIO-ECONOMIC ASSESSMENT: THE "WEATHER STRESS INDEX" AS AN EXAMPLE

(pp. 7 – 17)


Laurence S. Kalkstein

Center for Climatic Research

University of Delaware Newark, Delaware


Abstract


Although geographical climatologists have greatly expanded their research directions in recent years, they have largely ignored the impact of climate upon a variety of socio-economic factors. This is unfortunate, as government policy makers and other non-climatologist professionals require such information in an easy to comprehend format. Geographical climatologists have been reticent to become involved, partially because these desired products of lesser complexity run counter to the traditional sophisticated research output of most academics. Recent increasing interaction between geographical climatologists and those involved in climate/socioeconomic research has been a positive development, as demonstrated by the publicity afforded the weather stress index. The demand for quality products of lesser sophistication and greater comprehension is great, and the audience of decision-makers requiring the information is enormous.




THE DETERIORATING TRADE POSITION OF THIRD WORLD NATIONS: BEYOND OPEC

(pp. 18 – 28)


J. Harold Leaman

Villanova University

Villanova, Pennsylvania


Abstract


According to international trade theory, all countries should benefit from free and unrestricted trade in goods for which each country has a comparative advantage. Despite lip service support of less restrictive trade policies, actual trade practices indicate many restrictions. Protectionism for domestic industries in many developing nations in the form of import substitution policies or regional economic integration plans. The industrialized countries of North America and Western Europe are under increased pressure to protect the jobs of workers in many different industries by the limitation of imports from lower cost labor markets in Third World Nations. The concept of cartels for strategic raw material producers using OPEC as a model appeared as an attractive method of re-allocating a greater share of income to the developing nations during the 1970's. This study focuses on several fundamental weaknesses of cartels of raw material producers and the trade position of Third World Nations as they face the 1980's.




INDUSTRIAL LOCATION AND RESIDENTIAL SPACE PREFERENCES AT THE METROPOLITAN SCALE

(pp. 29 – 42)


Howard A. Stafford

University of Cincinnati

Cincinnati, Ohio


H. Peter Homenuck

York University

Toronto, Canada


Abstract


The literature on industrial location emphasizes the more quantifiable "economic" factors, while giving much less attention to the more subjective and "personal" site selection variables. At the metropolitan spatial scale, however, it is hypothesized that the awareness fields and biases of the location decision makers are especially influential. Examinations of branch plant locations and relocations within the Toronto, Ontario, metropolitan region reveal that the personal concerns of the decision makers, including their residential space preferences, are among the important location factors.




ECOLOGICAL CORRELATES OF CRIME FOR NEW CASTLE COUNTY, DELAWARE: A CANONICAL ANALYSIS

(pp. 43 – 70)


John C. Tachovsky

West Chester University

West Chester, Pennsylvania


Abstract


The primary purpose of this investigation was to determine the relationship between selected socio-economic characteristics and the observed patterns of crime rates in New Castle County, Delaware. The traditional ecological model was selected as the most useful and efficient framework for analysis. Measurements of the degree of spatial covariation between the distributional pattern of crime rates and the socio-economic spatial structure of the study area were conducted via principal components analysis and canonical correlation analysis.




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