Vol. 19, No. 1, April 1981 - "Social Issues"


DISTANCE AND THE USE OF TWO TERTIARY MEDICAL SERVICES IN NORTHWEST ILLINOIS COMMUNITIES

(pp. 1 - 12)


Joel B. Cowen

Executive Director Comprehensive Health Planning of Northwest Illinois (Health Systems Agency)


Abstract


Due to high capital and operational expenses and the need to serve large population bases, certain new medical techniques are being rationed at the regional level by Health Systems Agencies. Despite the fact that these services are not easily accessible to everyone, having large service areas in terms of population and distance, we would still hope that use by the population is uniform and not related to distance from the medical centers in which these services are located. A study of population use rates in northwest Illinois towns shows that this is not the case. Utilization of two such tertiary services, cardiac catheterization and CT scanning, declines with distance from the services. Several alternatives are offered to explain this phenomenon though future research will be needed to determine how these services might be used equally by all persons with the medical need.




CRIME IN NEW CASTLE COUNTY, DELAWARE: A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS USING MACRO AND MICRO SCALE DATA

(pp. 13 - 38)


John C. Tachovsky

Associate Professor Department of Government and Planning 

West Chester State College West Chester, Pennsylvania 19380


Abstract


This study has three major objectives: (1) to measure the effects of a change in the size of the units of analysis on the outcomes of the research, (2) to group crime types according to their patterns of spatial covariation and to examine the potential value of these groupings for crimenogenic research, and (3) to describe the distributional patterns of crime groupings elicited at different spatial scales. Two basic hypotheses are tested: there is no significant difference: (1) in the areal association of offense types or (2) in the distributional patterns of offense groupings, when viewed at different spatial scales.




SEARCH SPACE AND MIGRATION PATTERNS: BLACK MIGRANTS TO RACIALLY CHANGING NEIGHBORHOODS

(pp. 39 - 53)


Wesley W. Thomas

Assistant Professor Department of Government and Planning 

West Chester State College West Chester, Pennsylvania 19380


Abstract


The search space and migration patterns of black households taking residence in a racially changing neighborhood of Cincinnati, Ohio, were examined to reveal common characteristics of behavior. A sectoral migration pattern was evident with movement from areas nearer the inner city. Of those areas searched by the migrants, few considered the surrounding predominantly white suburbs or their previous areas of residence. Suburban home ownership was the major search priority with the efforts confined to areas with (1) blacks making up less than half of the population, (2) middle income social status, and (3) strong familistic character.



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