Vol. 7, No. 4, November 1969 - "College Geography"

 

 

A MULTI-LEVEL APPROACH TO TEACHING THE FIRST COURSE IN COLLEGE GEOGRAPHY

(pp. 1 - 7)

 

Vincent P. Miller, Jr. & Gopal S. Kulkarni

Indiana University of Pennsylvania

 

Abstract

 

American higher education has given a great deal of attention to the twin philosophies of liberal and general education. The intent of a liberal education is to "liberate and liberalize" the mind in the sense of luring the student in new directions. A general education is expected to bring the student to a face-to-face contact with contemporary reality.

 

 

 

TEACHER TRAINING OF THE GEOGRAPHY SPECIALIST IN ENGLAND

(pp. 7 - 14)

 

John C. Bentley

University of Pittsburgh

 

Abstract

 

Fundamental differences exist between the educational systems of the United Kingdom and of the United States; because of the differing contexts within which we work, we face different problems. There are similarities, but unless the points of difference are understood, we could be led towards misleading comparisons and conclusions when attempting to explain and contrast the pattern of College Geography and the training of the geography teacher in our two countries.

 

 

 

TECHER-TRAINING OF THE GEOGRAPHY SPECIALIST IN ENGLAND--THE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE IN GEOGRAPHY

(pp. 15 - 18)

 

Frank H. Molyneux

University of Nottingham, England

 

Abstract

 

Before amplifying one aspect of my colleague's admirable survey of the training of the English geography teacher, it would perhaps be profitable to examine further the contextual differences between our two countries by referring briefly to one of my own teaching functions at Nottingham University.

 

 

 

COLLEGE GEOGRAPHY MAJORS: THEIR EVALUATION OF GEOGRAPHY OFFERINGS

(pp. 18 - 24)

 

John A. Enman

Bloomsburg State College

 

Abstract

 

In preparation for revamping its curricula, the Geography and Earth Science Department, Bloomsburg State College, mailed out 163 3-page questionnaires to departmental graduates who had completed the requirements in Geography, Geography and Earth Science, or in Earth and Space Science. Graduates from 1965 through 1969 were polled. The list of graduates had to be compiled from yearbooks. To ensure that no one was missed those listed as members of Gamma Theta Upsilon also were canvassed, although it was known that a number of Elementary Education majors with the area of concentration in geography would be included. Forty-seven responses were divided among Elementay Education majors (16), Secondary Education majors (30), and from Liberal Arts (1). This report deals with the 31 responses from non-Elementary majors.

 

 

 

 


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