Vol. 6, No. 2, March 1968 - "Conference Issue"

 

 

SOCIAL SCIENCE IN EDUCATION

(pp. 1 - 5)

 

Dr. Raymond L. Lee

Indiana University of Pennsylvania

 

Abstract

 

Every society attempts to integrate its younger members into the existing social structure. American culture is no exception. At the college level the social sciences have assumed a three-fold responsibility. Each discipline is primarily concerned with students who major in its field at the undergraduate level and beyond. Secondly, as trained research scholars, professors also are committed to pushing outward the frontiers of their discipline through investigation. Finally, they acknowledge a responsibility for the education of all citizens at the elementary, secondary, and college levels.

 

 

 

COAL PRODUCTION EXPANSION IN WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA TO MEET THERMAL ELECTRICITY NEEDS

(pp. 5 - 9)

 

Charles E. Hurt

Ligionier Valley Schools

 

Abstract

 

The entire western Pennsylvania power complex is commonly known as the Chestnut Ridge Energy Center comprised of 8,000 square miles in parts of Armstrong, Cambria, Indiana, Jefferson, and Westmoreland Counties. (See Figure 1.) This plateau of the Allegheny Mountains is estimated to have 12,382,000,000 tons of bituminous coal reserves. It is believed that these coal reserves will last 243 years at the 1972 planned rate of production even when the new huge power facilities are completed.

 

 

 

UTILIZING REGRESSION ANALYSIS TO DELIMIT FACTORS OF INDUSTRIAL LOCATION

(pp. 9 - 14)

 

Lee C. Hopple

Bloomsburg State College

 

Abstract

 

Ascertaining and evaluating the factors of industrial location is one of the manufacturing geographer's primary problems. Prior to the advent of quantitative methods and computerization, substantial amounts of time were consumed in exhaustive but not always satisfying empirical analysis. Basic quantitative methods on the other hand, provide rapid and precise methods of measuring the correspondence between an

industry and an apparent factor of localization.

 

 

 

SOME PROBLEMS OF GEOGRAPHY IN THE BEACON PASSAGE OF AESCHYLUS' AGAMEMNON

(pp. 14 - 21)

 

Stanley Nodder

Dickinson College

 

Abstract

 

The ancient Greek tragedians have posed many interesting problems of geography and topography for their modern interpreters. They wrote as poets, not geographers, but their plays contain an abundance of geographical material. The tragedians were Athenians and they were writing primarily for an Athenian audience, but their plays were often set in a foreign land such as Persia, Egypt, or the region of Troy, or in a distant Greek city-state. In the plays they make frequent allusion to foreign places and peoples, and they offer considerable information about Greek geography and topography.


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