Vol. 8, No. 1, April 1970 - "Geography Curriculum"

 

 

GEOGRAPHY: IT'S FUTURE IN PENNSYLVANIA

(pp. 1 - 4)

 

Robert H. Carroll; Geography and World Cultures Advisor

Pennsylvania Department of Education

 

Abstract

 

On March 14, 1969 the State Board of Education approved changes in the General Curriculum Regulations. Various subjects were affected by these changes, including social studies and specific content within the social studies. The new regulations (requirements) became effective July 1, 1969.

 

 

 

SOME COMMENTS ON THE COLLEGE GEOGRAPHY PROGRAM OF BLOOMSBURG STATE COLLEGE

(pp. 5 - 8)

 

Dr. Bruce E. Adams

Bloomsburg State College

 

Abstract

 

Perhaps by reading the outline of Geography and Earth Science Program presented below, you will be informed more about the Department of Geography and Earth Science at Bloomsburg State College than you will carei to know, but I do so in order to illustrate what I judge to be a considerable and sustained growth of the Department and its program offerings during the last decade and one-half. It exceeded the normal department growth over the campus as revealed by the College enrollment.

 

 

 

TEACHING GEOGRAPHY WITH THE AID OF MUSIC

(pp. 9 - 13)

 

Dr. Anthony Sas

University of South Carolina

Brenda E. Dixon, Charlotte B. Legrand, & Constance R. Waggy

 

Abstract

 

For years, teachers at different levels of instruction have tried to create better understanding of and to enliven greater interest in their subject matter by playing music in the classroom. And most of them will agree that musical compositions, judiciously selected and pertinent to the topic under discussion, are not only meaningful to the students but, in addition, might plant in them the seed for further exploration of this art form.

 

 

 

TEACHING BETTER GEOGRAPHICAL MUD

(pp. 14 - 16)

 

Andrew R. Thompson

West Chester State College

 

Abstract

 

The process of education, it has been said, is very much like throwing mud at a wall undefined most of it falls off. Although it is conceded that analogies are inaccurate, they often do provide an effective technique for transmitting ideas. An analogy provides a different vantage point from which to conceptualize a thought or phenomenon, and thus can lead to an expanded if not new understanding. The ideas to be expanded upon here are those relating to the teaching of Geography.

 

 

 

TEACHER EDUCATION EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM

(p. 17)

 

Mamie L. Anderzhon

Indiana University of Pennsylvania

 

Abstract

 

The Teaching of Geography Class at Indiana University of Pennsylvania incorporated in the second semester schedule 1969-1970 the teacher education materials prepared by the High School Geography Project of the Association of American Geographers, supported by the National Science Foundation. These teacher education materials utilize parts of the units in Geography in an Urban Age, designed for ninth and tenth grades. The teacher education materials reflect the Project's emphasis on instructional strategies that encourage student inquiry and involvement. The class is participating in this experimental program during February and March.

 

 

 

A UNIT ON TOPOGRAPHIC MAPS IN THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL

(p. 18)

 

William J. Procasky

California State College

 

Abstract

 

Topographic maps can be effectively employed as a teaching unit in geography on the junior high school level. They offer an excellent combination of being informative and interesting. Before topographic maps can be successfully used, however, the student must have first acquired a working knowledge of the following concepts: latitude and longitude, scale, direction, relief, and the use of contour lines. Then these concepts will be greatly enhanced with completion of this unit.

 

 

 

ENVIRONMENTAL PERCEPTION BY GHETTO YOUTH IN PITTSBURGH

(pp. 19 - 22)

 

Joe T. Darden

California State College

 

Abstract

 

The summer of 1967 brought racial disorder to nearly 150 American cities. In April of 1968 the city of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania joined the ranks. Why did it happen? What can be done to prevent it from happening again?

 

 


The Pennsylvania Geographical Society exists to promote effective geographic teaching, research, and literacy.


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