Vol. 5, No. 3, April 1967 - "Junior Geographer"

 

 

MENNONITE COLONIZATION IN BRITISH HONDURAS

(pp. 2 - 7)

 

Thomas A. Minkel

Williamston High School

 

Abstract

 

Soon to join the ranks of the world's independent nations is the small British colony of Belize, or British Honduras, on the Carribean coast of Central America. In preparation for its independent status, a number of major problems must be considered. Among these are a very small population, extensive areas of unoccupied land, and inadequate agricultural production. Although the colony's area of 8,867 square miles is

slightly larger than Massachusetts, the total population in 1960 was only 90,500 or less than that of Allentown, Pennsylvania. Food products, in 1964, constituted 25 percent of the total import trade.

 

 

 

IMPORTANCE OF THE SHEEP TO THE AUSTRALIAN ECONOMY

(pp. 7 - 11)

 

Gary Bovard

Meadville High School

 

Abstract

 

"Australia rode to prosperity on a sheep's back." Since Australia's land and climate is ill-suited to the many other forms of agriculture and the mineral resources could not support large scale industry, to the Australians the herding of sheep was an obvious way of life. From the early days when Australia was primarily a penal colony, through the periods of growth, improvement and depression the Australians have learned

to depend upon the sheep's wool and meat as the motivating factor of the economy.

 

 

 

ATLANTIS: CITADEL OF THE MEDITERRANEAN

(pp. 11 - 15)

 

Wendy Prodan'

Meadville High School

 

Abstract

 

In history books Atlantis is dissmissed as a figment of Plato's imagination, today, in this age of scientific progress, Atlantis cannot be ignored as a fanciful myth. There remains the distinct possibility that perhaps Plato derived his ideas from sources, such as a traveler's tale or old records now destroyed. It is left up to the researcher to explore the myth of Atlantis and then make a decision as to whether it actually existed or not, and if so, where.

 

 

 

JAPAN: A CASE OF TOPOGRAPHIC FRUSTRATION

(pp. 15 - 18)

 

Paul Sexauer

Meadville High School

 

Abstract

 

Japan is a country plagued with many problems caused by her erratic topography. Japan's major topographical problems are spread out over roughly 85% of her 148,000 square miles.' Japan's topographical problems can be summed up into one word undefined mountains.

 

 

 

GEOGRAPHY AFTER HUMBOLDT AND RITTER

(p. 18)

 

John Palaski

St. Canice School

 

Abstract

 

The German geographers, Humboldt and Ritter in the nineteenth century had gathered together the geographical ideas of the past, and from their writings there emerged a new and unified concept of the nature of geography. The idea that Humboldt represented systematic or topical approach to geographic study in contrast with Ritter's regional approach has been over-emphasized by some geographers. Clearly both scholars used both approaches, perhaps with varying emphasis. The modern concept does not recognize the topical and the regional approach as different aspects of geography, but rather recognizes the need for combining them.

 

 

 

THE EVOLUTION OF THE EARTH

(pp. 19 - 20)

 

Barbara Muzio

Stetson Junior High School

 

Abstract

 

Through the years, the earth has undergone many changes. Men wondered how and why it did so, but their explanations at first were only hypotheses and guesses. A wise man of Greece said an ancient god tore apart mountains, making gorges. Others said that earthquake

were caused by gales that rushed into great caves. Volcanic eruptions were caused by winds in underground caverns that caused friction and then fire.

 

 

 

JIRAK'S JUNIOR JOGRAFER'S JOURNAL

(pp. 20 - 22)

 

Alsie M. Crowley & Debbie Dunmyer

Perry High School

 

Abstract

 

"The Geography Club of Perry High School is being founded to enrich the lives of those students who care to join in activities centered around Geography." It was because of educational sounding bulletins such as this one, that many students at first did not join what is now one of Perry's largest clubs. The idea, generally held by the student body, was that members would go around, "Sticking pins in maps.- Instead, the club sponsors field trips that require an active participation on the part of all of those involved. The purpose of the organization is to give first hand knowledge of geography (and possibly of danger), although the members think of themselves as anything but geographers, and consider "Geography Club" a misnomer.

 

 

 

 


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