Vol. 5, No. 2, March 1967 - "Conference Issue"

 

 

TRENDS IN THE LOCALIZATION OF MANUFACTURING IN PENNSYLVANIA 1947 - 1964

(pp. 1 - 4)

 

Dr. E. Willard Miller

The Pennsylvania State University

 

Abstract

 

Scholarly interest in the problems of industrial location has gained considerable attention in the United States in recent decades. The increase in studies measuring trends in the localization of manufacturing reflects a growing recognition that the solution of many industrial problems requires an understanding of temporal spatial changes. The purpose of this study is to apply a technique for measuring changes in the localization of manufacturing industries in Pennsylvania for 1947 to 1964 and to show how this technique can be utilized in classroom instruction.

 

 

 

PLACER MINING OF ANTHRACITE IN THE SUSQUEHANNA RIVER BASIN OF PENNSYLVANIA

(pp. 4 - 8)

 

Dr. George R. Rae & Dr. George F. Stauffer

Millersville State College

 

Abstract

 

Placer deposits of anthracite have been recovered for nearly eighty years from the streambeds in the Susquehanna River Basin (Figure 1) where dredging operations are reported to have commenced in 1889. As far as can be  determined, the recovery of coal by dredging appears to be confined entirely and uniquely to the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

 

 

 

THE USE OF 35mm SLIDES IN TEACHING PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY

(pp. 8 - 12)

 

Lee C. Hopple

Bloomsburg State College

 

Abstract

 

Physical geography, in its broad context, includes such other adjunct earth sciences as physical geology, climatology, pedology, and botany. Hence, the examination of the physical environment requires the scientific approach. Time, forces, and materials, together with structure, process, and stage, must be analyzed and their effects upon each other ascertained and appraised.

 

 

 

LAKE INFLUENCE ON THE GROWING SEASON OF ERIE, COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA

(pp. 13 - 15)

 

John Tomikel, Department of Geography

California State College

 

Abstract

 

Lake Erie affects the growing season length in the Erie County, Pennsylvania, lake plain region by moderating the temperature in both the early spring and late fall. As temperatures begin to drop in the fall and the first frost appears in the county, it is the southern portion, the plateau, that suffers. By this time the lake has built up a heat reservoir, and with this accumulation of heat,

prevents the lake plain temperatures from dropping below the freezing level. Hence, the northern portion, the lake plain, enjoys two more frost-free months than the upland plateau, the southern portion (Fig. 1 ) .

 

 

 

EGYPT - A STUDY OF EFFECTIVE NATIONAL TERRITORY

(pp. 15 - 21)

 

Dr. Robert Holz; Assistent Professor, Department of Geography

University of Texas

 

Abstract

 

Because of the agricultural limitations and over - population, Egypt, the United Arab Republic,1 is today faced with a serious food shortage, which is almost impossible to resolve within the limits of the agricultural resource base and the present economic and social organization of the country. So far famine has been averted by massive inputs of foreign aid and food exchange principally from the United States, but also from France, U. S. S. R., West Germany, Italy, and Spain.2 About one half of all the wheat flour consumed within Egypt is imported. This is in a country where agriculture accounts for about 40 per cent of the national income and between 80 and 85 per cent of total exports and where 60 - 65 per cent of the people are considered rural dwellers, dependent upon agriculture for a livelihood. Problems associated with a poorly educated, large, rapidly expanding population, living on a very limited resource base are the most significant facing the U. A. R. today.

 

 

 

MULTIPLE CRITERIA FOR DETERMINATION OF A RETAIL TRADE AREA: WARREN, PENNSYLVANIA

(p. 21)

 

Robert E. Grosch

Apollo Area Joint High School

 

Abstract

 

Despite unpromising environmental conditions, it proved practical to delineate the retail trade area of Warren, Pennsylvania by utilizing multiple criteria which required field work, canvassing, recording, and computerizing. It presented a difficult problem since the  New York State line to the north, the Kinzua Reservoir on the East, and the enveloping forest to the South presented unusual limiting influences, making some usual theories and techniques unsuitable.

 

 


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